Dirty Rotten Job Search Tricks: Find the employer behind a recruiter’s ad

Jun 12 2012 in Featured, reCareered Blog, Recruiters by Phil Rosenberg

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How many times have you thought: “If only I could get to the hiring manager … ”

Who says you can’t?

One problem candidates face is when responding to a job ad from a recruiter. These ads rarely identify the employer … for a few reasons:

  • Recruiters want to keep their competitors from stealing their business.
  • Recruiters don’t want you stealing their business – by going directly to the employer.
  • The employer asked the recruiter to make the search anonymous – because they don’t want their own employees or competitors to know about the search.

Just because a recruiter doesn’t want you to know the employer’s identity, doesn’t mean you need to listen to the recruiter.

What if you had a way to find out who the employer really is?

Recruiters are trained how to discover the employer behind anonymous ads. They’re experts at finding out the employer behind the ad (unless the employer is purposely trying to hide its identity). A good recruiter can figure out who’s actually hiring 50% of the time or more.

Recruiters are trained to be experts in finding out who’s hiring … especially who’s behind their competitors’ ads. It’s how recruiters make their living and it’s one way recruiters find new business.

I’ll show you some of the tricks that recruiters use to reach behind blind ads … so you can use these tricks to find the actual employer.

Google is your best friend here, but this same strategy can work well with SimplyHired.com and Indeed.com .

It sounds pretty simple – just search for the job. But what text do you actually search for?

Here’s 3 ways to search for the real employers behind blind ads:

  1. Search for unusual titles: If the title is unusual, there’s a decent chance you’ll find it on Google or one of the job board aggregators. Senior accountant is not unusual, but race coordinator might be unusual enough to find through a search.
  2. Search unique text: Find some text in the job ad that looks like it applies only to that specific position at that specific company. Try searching the text both with and without quotes. If that doesn’t work, try different text from the ad that looks specific to the position/company.
  3. Search boilerplate text: Find text in the ad that looks like it describes the company, rather than the position. Search for it both with quotes and without. You might have to try a few different boiler plate text selections, because recruiters will try rewrite the employer’s original ad to try and prevent you from finding the employer.

These are the exact methods taught to recruiters to help them build their books of business with new clients.

Why leave all the fun to recruiters? Now you’re empowered to find the real employer also.

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Phil shows you why your current job search strategies work against you and how to replace them with strategies that improve your odds. Phil provides you with research - cold, hard statistics provided by job boards and hiring managers themselves, to show you what works for you and against you in the worst job market in our lifetimes.

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Source: http://reCareered.com
Author: Phil Rosenberg

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